Harold Dieterle’s Marrow; Elegant NYC Restaurant in West Village

Man stands at the exterior of the the Marrow restaurant building to examine the menu

Harold Dieterle nails it again. When Chef Dieterle won the first season of Top Chef back in the mid-aughts, he parlayed his prize money into the pretty Cornelia Street spot Perilla, which has enjoyed a steady stream of contented guests ever since.

Next up was the more hyper, always packed Kin Shop, on Sixth Avenue, Dieterle's take on Thai and home to one of the most delightfully spicy dishes in town, the Duck Laab. Now Top Chef Harold Dieterle expands his West Village not-so-mini-anymore empire with the refreshingly grown-up Marrow, elegant and welcoming on a quiet Bank Street corner. And after a couple of months of full houses and a long string of good-to-rave reviews from every outlet in town, it's clear that Dieterle has yet another hit on his hands.

Off the Marrow's menu, the Duck Liverwurst, a trio of thick, glistening discs of the gamey bird, served with green mustard and roasted slabs of bread

The Menu at Harold Dieterle's Marrow

The Marrow has an interesting concept that could have been gimmicky but works just fine: one side of the menu is inspired by the Italian cooking of Chef Dieterle's mother (Famiglia Chiarelli); the other by his father's German heritage (Familie Dieterle). Needless to say, you're in for a meaty repast at The Marrow, which is fine by us and which, of course, also could have been foretold by the restaurant's name. Anyway, we finally made it over to The Marrow restaurant earlier this week and had wonderfully satisfying feast. Things kick off nicely on The Marrow menu with an eight pack of Meat Plates, all of which appeal. We went for the Duck Liverwurst, a trio of thick, glistening discs of the gamey bird, served with green mustard and roasted slabs of bread, all of which was gone almost as soon it arrived.   

Top Chef Hardold Sieterle's crisp and juicy Grilled Baby Chicken, placed on a pile of fennel, explosively flavored fried salami, charred leaves of Brussels sprouts, and plenty of chewy, garlicky chunks of panzanella

The Marrow Restaurant's Elegant Flair

A pair of The Marrow's starters came next, and Team Chiarelli's side of the things won handily here, with the restaurant's near-eponymous dish–The Bone Marrow–sparking a silent digging/dipping frenzy at our table. No surprise, really: the thing is topped with generous dollops of uni for heaven's sake, making it like a slick, rich, almost fetishistic surf and turf. Less successful was the Germanic Braised Rabbit and Pretzel Dumpling Soup, which sounded a lot less ho-hum than it tasted. Thankfully in this case, The Marrow places salt and pepper at each table. But Dieterle (who, yes, was actually in the kitchen on this night) saved our biggest winner of the night for last, a crisp and juicy Grilled Baby Chicken, placed precariously on a pile of fennel, explosively flavored fried salami, charred leaves of Brussels sprouts, and plenty of chewy, garlicky chunks of panzanella. An outstanding, instantly crave-able dish. The space itself is handsome, the service totally professional, the atmosphere thoroughly adult. We'll be back. 

The interior, seating, and table settings at Harold Dieterle's Restaurant in West Village

Harold Diererle's The Marrow in West Village 

The Marrow is located on the corner of Bank and Greenwich Streets in the West Village, and is open daily for dinner at 5:00 p.m., serving until 11:00 on Monday to Thursday, 11:30 of Friday and Saturday, and 10:00 on Sunday. The Marrow is also now open for brunch on the weekends, from 11:00 to 2:30. For more information and a look at the complete Marrow menus, visit the restaurant's website.

The Marrow on Urbanspoon

 

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